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Thursday, October 14, 2010

Teaching pedagogy

Teaching pedagogy
“Furthermore, if and when technology is used, it typically is not used to support the kinds of instruction (e.g., student-centred) believed to be most powerful for facilitating student learning (Cuban, Kirkpatrick, & Peck; 2001; International Society for Technology in Education [ISTE], 2008; Partnership for 21st Century Learning, 2007).”

“Alongside these increases in teachers’ professional uses are increases in the reported instructional uses of computers in the classroom (National Education Association, 2008; Project Tomorrow, 2008). Unfortunately, when we look closer at these data, reported uses still tend to be “low-level” (Maddux & Johnson, 2006; Russell, Bebell, O’Dwyer, & O’Connor, 2003)—that is, those that support traditional, teacher-directed instruction (e.g., using PowerPoint to present a lesson, searching the Web for information resources) or that focus on the development of students’ technical skills (Tondeur, van Braak, & Valcke, 2007b).”

“Using technology simply to support lecture-based instruction falls far short of recommended best practice (Lawless & Pellegrino, 2007; Partnership for 21st Century Skills, 2007; Zemelman, Daniels, & Hyde, 2005). Although survey data may suggest that the “teaching process is fundamentally changing as professional development is taking teachers from learning how computers work to using technology to change how they teach”
“When considering both analyses of large samples of data and interactional case studies of ICT use over time, two types of results emerge: (a) educational practises remain stable in many schools even with the introduction of ICT, and (b) ICT changes the type of skills and competencies needed. Interactional studies, which produce the second observation, contribute insights into how new educational practises emerge and into the relation that these practises have to the tools in use, such as the introduction of ICT tools as part of a reform.” (Rasmussen, I., & Ludvigsen, S. 2009)



My summary

On the whole teachers are not using the technology available effectively to enhance student learning in their classrooms. It appears that teaching pedagogy has failed to evolve as technology has evolved. Technology is based around students centred and group participation styles of learning, whilst many teachers still remain teaching in a teacher centred style of learning. This means that the technology being used in classrooms (if any) is ineffective. Teaching pedagogy will need to change to accommodate the new forms of technology available in classrooms and will need to take on a student centred approach.


Referencing:

Cuban, L., Kirkpatrick, H., & Peck, C. (2001). High access and low use of technologies in
high school classrooms: Explaining an apparent paradox. American Educational Research
Journal, 38, 813–834. Cited in Ertmer, P., & Ottenbreit-Leftwich, A. (2010). Teacher Technology Change: How Knowledge, Confidence, Beliefs, and Culture Intersect. Journal of Research on Technology in Education, 42(3), 255-284. Retrieved from Academic Search Premier database.

Lawless, K. A., & Pellegrino, J. W. (2007). Professional development in integrating technology into teaching and learning: Knowns, unknowns, and ways to pursue better questions and answers. Review of Educational Research, 77, 575–614. Cited in Ertmer, P., & Ottenbreit-Leftwich, A. (2010). Teacher Technology Change: How Knowledge, Confidence, Beliefs, and Culture Intersect. Journal of Research on Technology in Education, 42(3), 255-284. Retrieved from Academic Search Premier database.

Maddux, C. D., & Johnson, D. L. (2006). Type II applications of information technology in education: The next revolution. Computers in the Schools, 23(1/2), 1–5. Cited in Ertmer, P., & Ottenbreit-Leftwich, A. (2010). Teacher Technology Change: How Knowledge, Confidence, Beliefs, and Culture Intersect. Journal of Research on Technology in Education, 42(3), 255-284. Retrieved from Academic Search Premier database.

National Education Association. (2008). No Child Left Behind: Issue overview. Author. Retrieved on March 16, 2009, from http://www.nea.org/lac/esea/index.html. Cited in Ertmer, P., & Ottenbreit-Leftwich, A. (2010). Teacher Technology Change: How Knowledge, Confidence, Beliefs, and Culture Intersect. Journal of Research on Technology in Education, 42(3), 255-284. Retrieved from Academic Search Premier database.

Project Tomorrow. (2008). 21st century learners deserve a 21st century education. Selected National Findings of the Speak Up 2007 Survey. Retrieved March 28, 2009, from http:// www.tomorrow.org/speakup/speakup_congress_2007.html Cited in Ertmer, P., & Ottenbreit-Leftwich, A. (2010). Teacher Technology Change: How Knowledge, Confidence, Beliefs, and Culture Intersect. Journal of Research on Technology in Education, 42(3), 255-284. Retrieved from Academic Search Premier database.

Rasmussen, I., & Ludvigsen, S. (2009). The Hedgehog and the Fox: A Discussion of the Approaches to the Analysis of ICT Reforms in Teacher Education of Larry Cuban and Yrjo Engestrom. Mind, Culture & Activity, 16(1), 83-104. doi:10.1080/10749030802477390.

Russell, M., Bebell, D., O’Dwyer, L., & O’Connor, K. (2003). Examining teacher technology use: Implications for preservice and inservice teacher preparation. Journal of Teacher Education, 54, 279–310. Cited in Ertmer, P., & Ottenbreit-Leftwich, A. (2010). Teacher Technology Change: How Knowledge, Confidence, Beliefs, and Culture Intersect. Journal of Research on Technology in Education, 42(3), 255-284. Retrieved from Academic Search Premier database.

Tondeur, J., van Braak, J., & Valcke, M. (2007b). Curricula and the use of ICT in education:
Two worlds apart? British Journal of Educational Technology, 38, 962–976. Cited in Ertmer, P., & Ottenbreit-Leftwich, A. (2010). Teacher Technology Change: How Knowledge, Confidence, Beliefs, and Culture Intersect. Journal of Research on Technology in Education, 42(3), 255-284. Retrieved from Academic Search Premier database.

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